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Australian scientists have said that the inner core of the Earth consists of two layers




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Researchers from the Australian National University said that the Earth's inner core is two-layered. They calculated that the “innermost” core, with temperatures exceeding 5,000 degrees Celsius, makes up 1% of our planet's total volume.





Australian National University geophysicist Joanne Stevenson says that the special properties of this inner layer may indicate an event unknown to science in the history of the Earth.

The team used an algorithm that compared thousands of models of the inner core with data from decades of observations about how long seismic waves travel through the Earth.

Models of the anisotropy of the inner core demonstrate how differences in its composition change the properties of seismic waves. According to some, the material of the inner core directs seismic waves parallel to the equator. Other models claim that the combination of materials makes it possible to create faster waves parallel to the Earth's axis of rotation.

This study found a 54-degree change in the direction of the waves, with those moving faster passing parallel to the axis.

“We found evidence that may indicate a change in the structure of iron, which suggests perhaps two separate periods of cooling in the history of the Earth,” said Stephenson.

This work may explain why some experimental data do not correspond to current models of the structure of the Earth.

Scientists distinguish four main layers of the Earth: the crust, the mantle, the outer core, and the inner core. However, in recent years, they have already suggested the presence of the “innermost layer”. Prior to the current study, there was no evidence to support this theory.

Earlier, the European Space Agency detected a jet stream in the bowels of the Earth with a width of up to 420 kilometers at a depth of about 3000 kilometers. This stream circulates at a speed of 40-45 km per year.



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